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of us all someday will be. as his campaign song said, he ad high hopes, and so do we. and on we go. note] ♪ ♪ m his truth is marching on m m marching on m m glory glory hallelujah m m marching on m m glory glory hallelujah m m glory glory hallelujah m m his truth is marching on m m his truth is marching on m m glory glory hallelujah m m glory glory hallelujah m m his truth is marching on m m in the beauty of the memory m m christ was born m m with the glory in his -- mm m while god is marching on but on where we're going and what is possible by your grace beloved become a community which celebrates and in the midst ty of our god give p diversity. d in the challenging words may god bless us that answers have so that we may live deep may god bless ts us at anger at injustice, oppression and exploitation of people so that we may work for for ce freedom and peace all. and may god bless us with tears so we those who suffer may reach out and turn they pain into joy. and may god bless us with foolishness to believe that we can make a difference in this world so that we can do together wh
square was young people texting each other and using their smartphones and the virtues of being able to text and delete and connect with people -- and tweet and connect with people. it brought about another revolution. the same thing with syria. no leader anywhere in the world can afford to look away from huge populations of young people coming at us in unprecedented numbers. it is a different world. it will change politics. all of them in touch with aspirations. it is a different world. what we are going to try to accomplish with two enormous and high standard trade negotiations that are underway right now is to raise the standards and the possibility for people that trans-pacific partnership represents 40% of trade. and we can lock that in, it will open up trade around the world. it is the largest market in the world. it will create an enormous transformation in the standards that people are practicing. it is the largest market in the world. those efforts will dramatically expand our market reach and they will strengthen trading so we can engage and race to the top. not a race to t
accrue mostly to participate with higher skills. people can use computers. people can use robots and the like. and in that respect, even for a given distribution of educational outcomes, income distribution will widen, as the higher returns accrue to people who have the appropriate skill. so, it's hard to say entirely how to solve it. it's not a problem that can be solved quickly, but clearly trying to break down barriers to social mobility, trying to increase opportunities for training acquisition of skills, education, from a very young age, all the way through post-high school, junior college, and the like, is the basic approach. but it is a very, very difficult problem. to bring the federal reserve into it for a moment, as i said there's not much the federal reserve can do about very long-term trends like this that don't really have much to do with monetary policy. but over the shorter period, our efforts to put people back to work, and we are making extraordinary efforts to try to increase the number of jobs in our economy, that's going to be important factor reducing inequal
get across because those people can use that and can get a lot of press, even though they have a very small following in the united states. while you can talk about the first amendment, you need to explain that these are not mainstream people, that what they are saying is not something that a lot of americans are people -- picking up more americans feel. certain ones do. the best defense is to be as open as you can about it, try to explain it, and in some ways that the message fall flat for the united states and say what effect does this have on what we do? often the proof is it has very little effect on us. but we are constantly dealing with those guys. it is troublesome. but we have to explain this is our society and how we do it, but look at the results. >> do they throw back at us the same thing of all the people who are nursing terrorism, you throw -- throw us all in the same basket? >> yes, we hear constantly how varied muslims are, and in the field you appreciate that. muslims are like you and me. they just want a middle-class life, get their kids educated and all that. a lot o
to a live picture of the u.s. capital. the house and senate both out for thanksgiving recess. president obama has ordered flags to be flown at half staff until sundown today as today marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of president kennedy. >> this weekend booktv is live in florida for the miami book fair international. coverage kicks off saturday at 10:00 eastern on c-span2 with dave barry, brad meltsir, lawrence wright, doris kerns goodwin, nathaniel of philbrick and call ins with peter baker and susan herman. sunday's coverage starts at 10:30 and includes john higher oilman and chris matthews. miami book fair international live on booktv on c-span2 and don't forget to weigh in on our november book club question, what books are you reading on jfk. post your thoughts any time on our book club chat room, booktv.org/bookclub. >> ladybird johnson was the first wife of a president to become a millionaire by investing in and running radio and tv stations in texas. watch our program saturday at 7:00 eastern on c-span, live monday night our series continues. >> the historic trip t
it makes sense to invest in the united states and use this as your platform. i have to say i have been visited by companies from all around the world. some of which are represented in this audience in recent weeks who said between our legal system, our innovation, ecosystem, our workforce, the access to cheap and cleaner energy that this is a platform that they want to base themselves at. when you add to that, the network of trade agreements that were currently negotiating, this can be a global platform for exports and i think we'll see more and more investment as a resu result. we're seeing an investment in manufacturing in certain sectors we never thought we'd see additional investment and we're seeing expansion of services and investment in our agricultural sector, which is of world class character. so we're very optimistic about the u.s. being a platform for global investment and global exports with these treaties and agreements providing the context for that and this summit bringing attention to that and it's nice to be on a panel where everybody supports what it is that we're doi
? can you give us any more feelings on that?you listed it as one of the , but can you be more graphic? can you give us any more detail as to the extent about the cuts to our military capability. -- our military capability? statess in the united and one of those involved in protecting the government's thetion when we published strategic defense and security review in october of 2010. remarks, in my opening the administration at that time, although there were some underlying concerns, they were persuaded that we were going to spectrum of full capabilities, that they were reassured that our defense spending would remain above 2%, certainly throughout the life of this parliament, and that the numbers we were talking about for interventions in the future were scalable. they were not as great as we have managed before, but they were nevertheless militarily significant numbers for continuing operations and for large single operations. i talked also about the niche areas. they were reassured may be surprised we were putting an extra $1 billion with this parliament and that money was going to
. >> the fed used to have reserves and one of the changes is that now they can pay it and they look at the new tool of the interest rate. >> and number of people to put this in context a number of people have been arguing one of the problems in terms of funding investment in the private sector is that the fed is taking the money out of the system by paying interest on reserves. i think there is very little evidence that that is the case created the design of the policy was primarily to make sure that there was control over the rate to keep the fund rate is much narrower than they had been. remember that as a time when it was all over the place. it seemed to have worked quite effectively, and i think the evidence to that policy is pretty positive. the evidence against it in terms of its long-term effect is minimal. that doesn't mean that it couldn't be used to harm the private sector by taking the money out of the economy because they have discretion on the rate by which it pays for those funds obviously by the race that would be too high you could do a lot of damage but i don't think there is
will illustrate some of the points with case studies in which dna has been used in forensic contexts. so our body is a marvelous collection of about 100 trillion cells and inside almost all of these cells is the nucleus of a cell here. we can find dna. the dna is organized along chromosomes. he can observe the center of microscope and if we look very closely at these chromosomes, we see this double helix structure, the classic structure of the dna molecule. along the dna are these bases and its dreams of those bases that compose genes. we humans have about 21,000 genes and each gene and codes an important component of our body an important protein or enzyme. so we can think of the dna sequence as the body's instruction manual. it's the shop manual for the human body. i will show you a little of the sequence here and you can't read this. this is about 3000 bases, dna bases, a very tiny proportion of our total dna sequence. in fact each of ourselves our cells has about 3 billion dna-based pairs. so what i'm showing you here is roughly 1 million of the human genome and the genome is our entire dna-b
in the region, and ths state department has been on, engaged, so there has been a u.s. response with the n international community to assist the philippine nal co government. the immediate needs have been in the area of food, water, and medicine, and logistics, long-term needs are going to be the rebuilding of the affected l areas, and clearly that will become a challenge for the ge philippine islands, and for the help of the international community.help o it's personal to many people in america. we have 4 million americans of f filipino descent that live in america. and in the state of maryland, we have 26,000. we and yesterday, with the ambassador's assistance, and jeremy, with your help, we met with representatives of the hel filipino community in maryland,e and they are, obviously, very anxious because they have relatives and friends that werea directly impacted and they are worried about their well being.h they also are frustrated becaush they want to help, and how can they help? que and that's a question we're try going to try to focus on during this hearing, is how can individuals
the use of virtual currencies. then, a look at the process that granting security clearances for federal workers and contractors. and live at noon eastern, a heritage foundation panel on the deal struck in geneva, switzerland, on iran's nuclear program. >> today the heritage foundation examines the deal reached this it's weekend in geneva, switzerland, on iran's nuclear weapons program. watch the event live starting at noon eastern here on c-span2. also here on c-span2, a look at u.s./canada military relations. we'll be live at 1:30u p.m. eastern. >> the senate homeland security committee last week examined the government's ability to regulate digital currencies like bitcoin. this hearing is two and a half hours. [inaudible conversations] >> well, good afternoon, everyone. thank you for joining us. we especially want to thank our witnesses, panel number one, and somewhere out in the audience, panel number two. lost your id card, go around and pick it up, please, and put it where it belongs. that way we'll know who you are, and you will too. senator rockefeller, who i succeeded here in th
the government's ability to police the use of digital currency with the laws currently on the books. online decentralized systems allow people to exchange goods and services without using real money, including bit coins. this hearing is two and a half hours. >>> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for joining us, we especially want to thank our witnesses, panel number one, and somewhere in the audience, panel number two. the i.d. card is there, so pick it up please and put it where it belongs. that way we'll know who you are and you will, too. my succeeder in the senate used to say many years ago, he would say, his advice was wear a big button. wear a big button when you're campaigning so you'll remember your name and so will other people, too. we want to make sure people remember your name. over the past several months, this committee has engaged in a investigation into the potential implications of virtual currencies. during the course of this inquiry, we've examined the issues and potential risks and threats that virtual kecurrenci pose as well as some of the potential promise that some
background, making her show the highest rated talk show in television history. oprah winfrey has used her influence to support underserved communities and lift up the lives of young people, especially young women around the world. in her story, we are reminded that no dream can be deferred when we refuse to let life's bstacles keep us down. [applause] >> the medal of freedom honorees, please. [applause] all right, that concludes the formal part of today's ceremony. i want to thank all of you for eing here. obviously, we are deeply indebted to those who we honor here today. we're going to take some pictures with them and their family members. the rest of you, i understand the food here is pretty good. [laughter] o i hope you enjoy the reception and i hope we carry away from this a reminder of what jfk understood to be the essence of the american spirit, that it is represented here and that some of us may be less talented, but we all had the pportunity to serve and open people's hearts and minds in our maller orbits. i hope everybody has been inspired as i have been in participating and bei
minister argued for a --e active western european we had theink example of the use of chemical weapons in syria and it was the american president who had to persuade prime minister cameron. prime minister cameron already saw the need for action. in both countries, public opinion was extremely cautious. a majority was opposed to any form of direct military action, which is what came through here. that was ultimately the reason why american policy evolved as it did. even before the american position eve alt, my immediate reaction -- evolved, my immediate reaction was that it the type ofange relationship we have with america in one go. watching the american reaction in the days ahead for the president felt it necessary to consult congress. had there been a congressional vote, it it would have been touch and go. numbers and the house looked to be negative. in terms of having the u.k. and ,he u.s. at a popular level there is quite a shared set of views in the world we are in after afghanistan. the house of commons vote as having a negative vote on the u.k.-u.s. relations. the u.s. was in th
, but it has made a difference in our country and he inspired many of us to be involved in politics. much legislation sprang from inch of rain his original agenda but we will talk more about that this afternoon. just remembering always that resident kennedy said children are our greatest resources and best hope for future and hopefully that will be the spirit of this budget that we think in terms of our children, their families and their future. thank you all. .. >> the world of cable from that of author with the big picture. >> secretary of state john kerry told the senate foreign committee that the united states should ratify the disability act. >> good morning, this hearing on the sena aate floor of the righ of people with disability comes to other. let me thank secretary kerry for being here. first, i think he has the thanks of all us on the committee for the incredible work you have been doing across the globe. and your presence sends a strong message about the importance of the issue. we appreciate you coming back to chair. we received the support of thousands of people and organiza
-- for illegal uses. that can include outright fraud at best or it can include -- the u.s. house has the very strict used than what it was appropriated for by congress. violation of that can entail civil and criminal penalties. because the accounting is so opaque, it is impossible to tell whether there are anti- deficiency act violations and perhaps whether they are even widespread. that perhaps is a reason over the long haul that there has been resistance tearing up the accounting, because often it is experience -- it is expedient when money is needed to finish revamping a helicopter or installing something on a ship, they just can't immediately take money from the wrong account -- they just immediately take money from the wrong account and spend it on that. host: one of the key quotes in your piece is by then secretary of defense robert gates -- "my staff and i learned that it was nearly impossible to get accurate information to questions such as much money did you spend and how many people do you have." secretary robert gates in 2011. a c-span democrat on twitter asks, "is the
avenue. the marine band was just passing this horrifying sight for all of us, swinging down pennsylvania avenue, the west point cadets in the contingent from annapolis and the air force academy and the coast guard. escorting their late commander and it is hard to realize that on this marvelously clear and beautiful, understandably beautiful day, this is what we are all coming to washington to witness. the crowd that has gathered is not a large one. it is one deep in most places because most of the crowd will be along the large march later. beyond the white house to which the procession is now going. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> passing sixth street and pennsylvania avenue ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ we are at the junction of independence avenue and pennsylvania avenue. and they will shortly make this turn into pennsylvania avenue. for the long broad approach to the white house. from there to the white house. now the first cause to make the turn. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> how the cars are approaching the junction of constitution and pennsylvania avenue, constitution avenue is t
of of us in the near future is to universalize the protocols. we are working on expanding the applications and implementation. 2009, joined the iaea in there were 93 countries that implemented the protocol. now 121 countries are implementing the protocols. additional protocols are to exclude the possibility of undeclared activities. we would like to see more countries that would adhere to the additional protocols. where else we could do more or not, i think that the priority for us is to universalize or expand the number of countries that implement the initial protocols. unfortunately, because the questions are excellent, we will break off questions now. r> dear little -- leade references are a little uncomfortable, but i -- i'm jane harman. before becoming president and ceo of the wilson center two and half years ago, i served as a member of congress for nine terms. i met with you in vienna as part of a delegation in january 2010 just after you have -- had assumed the responsibility as director general. we in congress at the time knew three things about you, and they still apply. number o
that by using our targets financial measures under 311 of the patriots act to name liberty reserve as a primary money concern. we stand ready to take additional regulatory actions as necessary to stop other abuses. as the financial intelligence unit for the united states, fincen must stay current on how money is being laundering in the united states so we can share the expertise with our law enforcement, regulatory, industry, and foreign policies and serve as the cornerstone of this country's aml regime. we're meeting this as we continue to deliver cutting edge analyt klt products to inform the actions of our partners. we're committed to remaining at the forefront of development in the years to come. we have made oversight of the virtual currency development a priority, and we're encouraged by the progress we have made thus far. thank you for inviting me to testify before you today. >> thank you so much for being here. for the meeting you had with our staff and me last week, and for your testimony. thank you. ms. raman, pleasero proceed. >> thank you for the opportunity to come before the commi
to does his support for the treaty. i know, that the secretary changed his schedule to be with us today. he's a keynote speaker at the disability-related event this evening in new york. we'll be excusing him around 4:30 or so do so. secretary, we're pleased for joining us. thank you for rearranging your schedule today. i will leave congresswoman duckworth to be recognized by senator dire bin. someone who has done a tremendous amount of work on the cannot of veteran's affairs and personal testimony about her personal experience as a wounded warrior is invaluable to the committee. i want to ask former attorney general who is here to discuss the practical importance of ratification, and let me also recognize his wife, jenny, who is accomplished in the field of disability advocacy. we appreciate you being here as well. let me ask dr. susan from the catholic family and human rights institute. professor timothy meyer, the assistant professor school of law. and michael faris to join us as well as they offer their views on the treaty. thank you, all. let me turn to senator occur bib. >> t
of the president's assassination. you can join us at these numbers. we will also read some of your tweets. we'll get to your phone calls in just a moment and take you live to dallas once that event gets underway. it had been set to start at 12:30 eastern, so they are running a few minutes late. we are reading some of your comments on facebook. mary mcdonald says 30 years ago i was 17 years old, a high school senior, and my last class of the day -- again, we will be covering events related to the 50th anniversary. dallas is next, and they get underway, set to start at 12:30. we will take you there live when it starts. we will show you the events at the john f. kennedy library in boston, which will come up sometime in the 2:00 eastern heart. afternoon.good caller: good afternoon. even though i was not born yet, my mother was expecting me. you are on the air. go ahead with your comments. i think we may have lost catherine. do call back if you want to. the numbers are on the screen. anthony is in los angeles. caller: hi. i remember when i was a child, i is only 2 1/2 years old, and was standing w
. statehood can be a fiction that hides dangers lurking beneath. all of these challenges will be with us for the foreseeable future. there is not a short-term vision to these are a first century threats. we must manage through these realities as we engage these complex problems. staying focused on our long-term interests and long-term objectives and outcomes. the imperfect outcomes may be the most we can expect, working our way toward the higher ground of possible solutions. leveraging all aspects of our power, we must multiply and enhance our efforts by working through coalitions of common interest like nato. this is in fact our future. just as we have done since world war ii, but it now may be more essential than ever before. while these challenges are not america's responsibilities alone, they will demand america's continued engagement. no other nation, no other nation has the will, the power, the cast the, "he, and a network of alliances to lead international community in addressing them. however, sustaining our leadership will increasingly depend not only on the extent of an great p
of reasons. >> can you say it one more time? >> i'm often, can really compete for the u.s. on a level playing field basis with everyone else said why don't we build anything? in fact, we felt a lot here and it's time it came from athens, georgia last evening because yesterday we cut the ribbon on a brand-new greenfield factory 850,000 square feet. 1400 people strong when it's fully operational at the end of next year. these will be small bulldozers and small excavators that were formally only produced in japan. we brought those to the united states for several reasons. one, we can compete from the base there to relate the ports in here and that production will stay in the u.s. in the exported to south america and europe. we feel there is a very good chance at a very good condition to not only build here, but compete to a u.s. base. a year ago we did the same thing in victoria, texas on another excavator plan. these are the large machines. 42 that 5010 machines that came in from japan that will be built in us for the first time in the united states and exporting to south america. some of that
and capacity to control the impulses was virtually nonexistent. the genetic evidence was used to challenge it saying the person didn't have the necessary mental state. to provide a novel serious -- that the person's own self provoked him rather than some external person, totally novel theory; right? and try to mitigate. didn't work in this case, and hasn't worked in a lot of cases because the objective circumstances are different than the neurological evidence. evidence of planning as we ordinarily understand it by a guy, taking it to a place, pulling a trigger saying die all right. those objective things lint face a lot of neurological ens. this just tells you -- the red bar is bad for the criminal defenses. the blue bar is good for the criminal defenses. whenever you are in the room you should see a lough red. you should see a little bit of blue and the little bit of blue you should see is around mitigation. in effective assistance of counsel mitigation, and soming aggravation. in general, it's not working we again, remember it's a subset of cases. it may be more effective i
day and thanks for joining us. next, president obama pardons to turkeys at the white house. then part of the national menorah lighting ceremony celebrating hanukkah which began last night. from novemberage 25, 1963 of the state funeral for president john f. kennedy. the c-spanternoon, series on first ladies continues with a look at the life of jacqueline kennedy. pardoned twoama national thanksgiving turkey's yesterday at the white house. there is a look. >> ah - good afternoon everybody and happy thanksgiving. ,he office of the presidency the most powerful position in the world, brings with it many awesome and solemn responsibilities. this is not one of them. [laughter] the white house turkey pardon is a great tradition and i know malia loves it as does sasha. generally speaking, thanksgiving is a bad day to be a turkey. especially in a house with two dogs. i salute our two guests of honor, carmel and popcorn for their bravery. they came all the way from outside badger, minnesota to be with us. they, like my chief of staff, are vikings fans. i'm not sure they know that -- see? i'm
morning encased 12158, bond v. u.s.. >> mr. chief justice and may it please the court. of the statute at issue year does reach every malicious use of chemicals anywhere in the nation as the government insists then it clearly exceeds congress''s limited and enumerated powers. this court's cases made clear it is a bedrock principle of the federal system that congress lacks general police power to criminalize conduct without regard to jurisdictional element or some nexus to a matter of distinctly federal concern. the president's negotiant and the senate and ratification of treaties with foreign nations does not change the bedrock principle of our constitutional system. >> the 3d is valid and the implementing of legislation seems to largely copy without getting anything so the treaty could be constitutional but implementing legislation adds nothing is constitutional. >> i would quarrel with your premise. it is through the convention in the statute used similar terms and terminology. there's one important difference between the convention and the statute that differentiates
is using airport kioskss, assessing a gms, using teleconferencing facilities obtaining multimedia digital content through their computer or cellphone any time any place of standard harmonization is absolutely vital to the u.s. and u.s.-based companies and we can see three reasons it can help. first, it embraces inclusion in a d a. and u.s. access ability standards so for the u.s. companies it is important to implement. these harmonize standards for investment in accessible technology and help us achieve positive return on investment. finally, it helps the u.s. ability to continue to lead innovation more wide as crpd country's interest the accessibility leadership and our ability to influence them is diminishing. onto the policy benefits it is no exaggeration to say that in many cases policies make markets. the u.s. section 508 is a great example. prior to the enactment of the federal procurement policy the accessibility marketplace was not an investment priority but section 508, the buying power of the u.s. government have transformed the marketplace and played a major role in def
the largest bond issue in u.s. history and put all of the money into pensions. what happened was when 2008 rolled around gm did not have the resources to go back to the market and get the tens of aliens of dollars it made to keep going on like ford who mortgage the entire company and raise the money it needed to get itself through the downturn. you can say it was locked but there will -- but sometimes you make your own lock in corporate america and it was a combination of factors that cause gm to tumble. for a much for stopping by. have a nice thanksgiving. happyh you a very thanksgiving as well and we are back tomorrow at 7 p.m. -- 7 a.m. eastern time. there is live coverage at the national press club. they are looking at holiday spending and this event is just getting underway live here on c- span. >> in fact, in every year we have conducted this survey, actual holiday spending has increased. these two years were 2008 and 2009 during the recession. interpreting the results is how the proportion says it will increase or decrease spending that changed over time. except for 2008, at the d
, their staff without coming to us. and so now i think it's appropriate that any president can now form their executive branch with only 51 votes needed in the united states senate, not a supermajority. so that is a huge step in the right direction. and now we can confirm judges of all the courts less than the supreme court -- circuits and district court judges -- again, with 51 votes, without this supermajority that's been filibustering for so long. now, i listened to the republican leader during the run-up to these votes, and he said that we were somehow going to break the rules -- break the rules to make a new rule. well, we did not break the rules. with the vote that we just had, the senate broke no rules. the rules provide for a 51-vote nondebatable motion to overturn the ruling of the chair. we've done it many times in the past. many times. -- many times in the past. so we did not break the rules. we simply used the rules to make sure that the senate can function. and that we can get our nominees through. i like what the writer gail collins said in her column in "the new york time
notice we have the scale of sheets that are on your table. they are reviews. we use them -- we review them very carefully afterwards. that is why we think our programs have improved over the years because we listen to what you have to say and try to give you the type of programs you really are interested in. we would also have another announcement. our committee will be having on friday november 15 an address addressed by ambassador marc grossman. he is the vice-chairman of the cohen group. he will be speaking about the diplomatic campaign in afghanistan and pakistan. he will be at the university club at 8:00 a.m. on november 15 so please take out your black areas in iphones. we also have another speaker. the senior adviser for transnational homeland security and counterterrorism program at the center for strategic and international studies. that will be wednesday december 4. also at 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and that also will be held at the university club which is on 16th street in the northwest. i also have a very special announcement. as many of you know the aba standing committee i
for us having the center we are saving 3 billion a year. the fact we are moving from datacenter spiritedly generated through carbon, having it at a renewable center was a big advantage in something i have always wanted. >> i think there are some best best practices of state and local governments. we see the best practices occur a projectwill appoint manager to shepherd personal cell phone, give details 24 hours a day, call us, and we will solve the obstacle. opportunitiesl are more standard there are some sharings they have been across the board. wax one thing we talked about is infrastructure. maybe just share a little bit about what we could be doing to make sure we are investing in our infrastructure. >> this is near and dear to me. around the world, every leader is looking for a way to find jobs, and they have lack of capital for infrastructure. that is how they can create more jobs. one thing that is very clear, when you look at countries that infrastructure, there is a partnership between public and private. it is imperative that we have a policy for infrastructure buildin
telling us anywhere from 20 to 80% of their individual business is being councils so that's a big spread and some pretty big numbers. it could be a substantial number of people getting those notices. >> host: how are employers picking the ones to cancel? >> guest: insurers are looking at this and they are saying policies that didn't exist before march of 2010 or new policies that people have purchased since 2010 are unlikely to be grandfathered. if they are not grandfathered and don't meet the requirements of the affordable care act it's likely they will get a notice. to put this in context before the affordable clean air act insurers would cancel policies. it was an unusual. they would discontinue product lines that weren't profitable for them. this is not unusual but what is unusual is the scope of and number of people that are likely to get these. >> host: consumer advocates are concerned that insurers are using these cancellations to target their most costly enrollees. >> guest: some consumer advocates are worried that maybe they are just taking unprofitable lines of business. insure
. >> attorney general thornberg, we all recognize that the u.s. is the gold standard on disability rights. if we're at the gold standard, i mean, i certainly understand why it's in our best interest to have other countries obligate themselves to meet our gold standard, but i don't get why we should be ratifying a treaty that obligates us to do things that are still open to or subject to interpretation. that's my concern. i think that's the core concern of those that may not be supportive of the treaty currently. can you explain that to me? >> i think so. the basic gap in understanding is what the consequences of ruds are. the treaty that's adopted includes the reservations in understandings and deck collar rations that accompany it. when we say we're not going to do something that we specified we do not include within the am bit of the treaty amended by ruds, it doesn't mean we flout convention, but that we implement it with the ruds in mind, and that's true not only of what the united states does, but other countries -- >> if we're the gold standard, what do we have to interpret in implementing
transparency is urgently necessary to restore the international community's trust in the u.s. government and in our u.s. internet industry, which is projected to lose tens if'll hundreds of billions of dollars in the face of widespread concern from foreign governments and international users. we must take this opportunity to demonstrate that our surveillance practices are necessary and proportionate and respectful of constitutional and human rights. and if the numbers show otherwise we must take this opportunity to reform our surveillance laws as well as better protect our rights and national security. speaking of national security there are two basic arguments why publishing these numbers would threaten it, but neither is persuasive. first there's concern that such reporting will reveal which services have not been targeted by the u.s. government such that our enemies will seek them out. however, it has always been the case companies that haven't received national security demands can say they have not received national security demands as was most recently demonstrated just last week w
national park in this map as well. and yet using it as an example, 66 parts per billion, which is above what some of the proposed standards are and are being considered. and i guess i would just ask if you are aware that some of the most remote and pristine parks of the country have an ozone that exceeds the range of this proposed standard? >> there is no proposed standard at this point. let's just make sure that people are not confused by that. but i would also say that i know the science advisory board is looking at this issue with the staff so they can establish some recommendations to me, moving forward and take a look at these issues. >> okay. maybe there isn't a proposed standard and it depends on what the meaning of the word is is and we could go back to technical definitions. but there is certainly definitions of a standard of 60 parts per billion. >> i do not know whether that is part of the consideration that the science advisory board will advise her advising on. >> this spring we were told that that was a standard that they were considering and that they were not only consid
add on to the standard that is required before you can even investigate less useful tool becomes. for example, if you talk about reason to believe the number me lead to contact in the united states, that is exactly what we are trying to find out here. we have got a number. if we have a terrorist phone number, what exactly we are trying to find out is do we have information to think that this may lead to the drooping investigation in the united states? >> one quick thing, raj, if i could. on the question of follow-up, there is a very close review of the ras determination itself. what is your review of how the fbi uses the information that is generated? >> we use the information as it was indicated to further our investigative efforts so we can open up on their investigation perhaps, or we can open up an investigation. but it's the sort of review process to go and look at what was the outcome, how was it used, how do we come from or not confront an individual to the tracing all the way down to the street or to the fbi follow-up investigation. what sort of assessment or tracking is
give us some sense of a total cost for this and what it's going to cost to field it over at the department of defense? >> i can't speak to the total cost. i would have to come back with hat information, but i can give you a status of how the automated continuous evaluation system sbg used. it -- is being used. it has the capability of flagging concern. so that's an existing capability. as you mentioned, it was used in an army project. ut of 3,300-odd individuals, a total of 100 personal actions were taken as a result of information identified during those queries. in addition, the defense security enterprise is developing a continuous evaluation concept demonstration, which would take this a step further. aces, the automated continuous evaluation system, does a one-time snapshot in time query, this concept demonstration would have real time updates so that as information became available it would be pushed into the system. and the concept demonstration is currently scheduled to run from april to october of 2014. the anticipated population would be 100,000 cleared military
to publish basic statistics about how the government is using its national security surveillance authorities. particularly in the wake of recent revelations about the nsa's surveillance programs, we believe this level of transparency about what companies do and don't do in response to government demands is critically important for three reasons. first, the american people and policy makers have a clear right and need to know this information so that they may have a more informed public debate about the appropriateness of the government's use of its authorities and to better ensure those authorities are not misused or abused. second, the company have a clear first amendment right to tell us this information. and the government as tempt to gag them from sharing even this most basic data or even to admit that they have received foreign intelligence demands at all is clearly unconstitutional. indeed you'll see this prior restraint at work in the room. even though everyone in this room knows and understands that google has received foreign intelligence surveillance act process, google's represent
that the administration has made to nato to take the u.s. deployment of u.s. missile defenses to defend the u.s. from europe in to deployment of nato missile defense to nato to defend nato. that was the fundamental shift that occurred in september of 2009. to take system that was able deploy against possibly ten incoming missiles and put in place a nato system under nato command and control put the deference of nato countries. that is the kind of commitment to deterrence that we put in place. we put in place contingency plan to make sure that every nation that is a member of nato has a plan to be defended. that was an important contribution to deterrence. we just completed this month -- this week, last week. the first major article r5 last exercise. the alliance was conducted in the last ten years. many of the country nas participated in the exercise had never participated in an article five exercise and we just completed that. those are the kinds of steps that matter for collective desks. far more than the nuclear weapons you have. particularly when the cost of modernizing the nuclear weapons runs i
and the first thing we'll do is i'll use my conventional forces, and if that fails, use strategic forces. i tell you, it's going to turn around. don't think about it in a nuclear sense, but think strategic first, coming from great distance or no distance, to solve a problem. last, think about the conventional forces and moving and huge costs of standing armies and moving them to the problem. it's just the reality we have to deal with, and how we're going to do that, how are we going to afford it, those are the the questions, i think, that we're going to, as an alliance, come to grips with and understand how to do that; ours, we're not matching resources and capabilities with the security that we desire to have. >> thank you. >> other than that i'm in a good place. >> that leaves a good place. the leading expert brings a dose of reality, make it a concern, particularly such with europe. when you hear those speakers, particularly john cartwright's point about, you know, we have to be ability to exercise and leverage increasing speed and deploy our forces. do you see this happening in nato? is nato
. and i applaud the u.s. this leadership. and then on the logistics, i one really do thank our department of defense. i they understand how to get to people who have been isolated e and to get a better assessment. let me point out one obvious ano point here. p most of the damage was done on s the coast. and that's what we saw.tha we could reach the coast.t' we could not reach communities isolated from the coast. therefore, initially, there wasn't a good understanding as to the severity of the damage inland. do we now have some indication as to whether there is going to be additional significant losses as a result of reaching people that we weren't able to reach originally?cant los >> thank you, senator. we did initially focus on the coast. we also did initial over-land and overflight assessments in some of the inland areas, as as well, working with our dod rkini colleagues. our initial assessment was that. l areas were the worst affected so that was the first priority for focus.at as that situation has started to stabilize, maybe too strong a word but let's say head in the e direction o
th region that the u.s. military, u as you said, in addition to to being an unmatched fighting force, also brings unmatched logistical capabilities. which they use, unfortunately al have to use quite often in the f region for disaster response. i think that's gone widely noticed. i wouldn't want to speculate on why the chinese have responded the way they have. i do know at some point d philippine authorities suggestet there was no need for further gd medical equipment and support, r whether that played a role on ma the hospital ship not coming, i'm not sure. ship i think the more important point from our perspective is by doing the right thing, we've seen seen in the region as doing the righe thing.st >> well, just my editorial comment to close, and i don't expect you to respond to it, bur we have this debate going on in this country how engaged the u.s. needs to be around the world diplomatically in aid programs, and of course militarily with our presence. this is an example what would mi happen if the u.s. did retreat e from the global stage.. there is no substitute for the united
to defy his own party to some extent but it didn't occur to us to think these poor people. i also believe this was not stimulated by the politicians. this is genuine public anger. >> and appointed fairness the house republicans leadership step up and john boehner, eric cantor, paul ryan. >> they replace their negotiator >> they had no negotiator. >> yes they did. >> they still had a majority voting against them. >> understand but let's give credit where it is due. >> in my experience when the house leadership republican house leadership cares they do better than the minority of their own party. >> i have serious reservations about that characterization. i think a lot of people went to the floor on that monday and voted no because they thought the leadership have the votes to pass the bill. they couldn't gather -- gavel back in. i think that was true of both sides. >> not so much on your side. nobody ever casts political votes on your side. >> on this one judd wait a second. it's about politicians and politics and i know that may upset some people because we are only supposed to these talk
industry. we want to go up to new york now, where daniel yergin is joining us. he is the author of both "the quest," and "the prize." you have been to cushing oklahoma. how would you describe it? guest: you see all of the tanks, and it is quiet, and you have the oil moving at the stately rate of four miles per hour. it is very calm, yet you realize it is one of the notable points in the oil industry, and we see on the reports of what the oil price was, it all goes back to cushing, which has been a great gathering point, really, for about a century now. host: why does it all go back to cushing? guest: there was an oil field discovered there before the first world war and it was called the queen of the oil fields, and at one point it provided 22% of the u.s. total oil, and a lot of the oil produced by the u.s. army in europe was made in cushing oklahoma, and the oil system was old, but the pipeline system had been set up to move supplies around so it became the gathering point. it all flowed through cushing and went out to other pipelines two refineries around the country to make products
. they have both sides of this deal. they can denounce the deal the u.s. still has important military relationships with the state of israel that are effectively unperturbed by this that willugh continue, including undertakings and understandings about what the u.s. will do to protect our common security interest rates that might be threatened by iran that are unaffected by the israeli denunciation of the atlomacy that helps them home and hedges against things that might go wrong in that diplomacy. they noticed a lot of other people who were concerned about iran and making statements that say, "i do not trust iran" in effect. who does? the policies of this and the percentages in the different place. i have some empathy. say theywhen people support new sanctions, but the sanctions would be made conditional on waiting to see whether or not we failed to get a final deal and the sanctions might then be put on a suspense so they would go into effect after efforts to get a final deal. if you study what is involved, you will see how much iran's good faith will be tested by all of the activit
. we all acknowledge that the treaty is based upon basically the u.s. law, the ada. we passed that in 1990. i remember in 1991, congressman hoyer who was then chairman of u.s. helsinki commission traveled to moscow and became part of the moscow declaration document, which started the international effort to use u.s. law as the model to protect universal -- university the rights of people with disabilities. so the united states has been leadership. the point i would raise, that failed to ratify i think compromises the u.s. ability to advance these standards globally. it weakens our own credibility to participate in the development internationally of the rights of people with disabilities and is the chairman pointed out and as others have pointed out it also compromises very much american citizens who are in other countries and their own protections if we happen to ratify the treaty we're sorting out in the same position as we would for the rights of people in our own country. secretary ridge, your comments, generally. >> i just wanted to respond to a but a very appropriate ques
to actually affect the individual lives of citizens here in the country? is there a way of us coming together and writing ruds in that way? >> senator, thank you for the question. i think with respect to the federalism issue, a federalism reservation could address the federalism problem that you've identified. federalism reservation could, i think, be drafted to be somewhat stronger than the reservation that currently reservation attached to the resolution for ratification that came out last year. conceivably such a reservation would make very clear what the e numb rated powers that congress possesses are. and reserve out of any obligations that couldn't be satisfied through the exercise of those powers. with respect to the interpretation issue, i think a set of understanding could be drafted that would make very clear that the united states does not accord any significance to the interpretation of the convention afforded by the committee. i think it would go a long way toward addressing the concern that the convention might be used to interpret federal statutes including essentially preexist
using the same precedent our democratic friends want to set. so they want to have it both ways. but this sort of gerrymandered vision of the nuclear option is really just wishful thinking. as the ranking member of the judiciary committee, senator grassley, pointed out yesterday. the majority leader changes the rules for some judicial nominees, he is effectively changing them for all judicial nominees, including the supreme court, as senator grassley pointed out just yesterday. so look, i realize this sort of wishful thinking might appeal to the uninitiated newcomers in the democratic conference who served exactly zero days in the minority, but the rest of you guys in the conference should know better. those of you who have been in the minority before should know better. let's remember how we got here. let's remember that it was senate democrats who pioneered, who literally pioneered the practice of filibustering circuit court nominees and who have been its biggest proponents in the very recent past. after president bush was elected, they even held a retreat in which they discus
will have a host country that can work with us to affect the destruction outside of syria of these precursor chemicals. secondly, our cooperation with the russian federation has so far been strong. we will continue to expect the russian government to press the syrian government for full compliance with its obligations. this will be essential as we move ahead. third, we continue this process with our eyes wide open. we are about to enter what could be the most complicated phase in terms of both logistics and security. that is, the removal of chemical precursors in large quantities from several sites within syria to the coast for removal on a ship to another country. that has both big logistical problems to think through and certain security risks. at the same time, while the record so far is acceptable, we do not assume or take for granted that the syrian government will continue full compliance with its obligations. we have the tools we need granted by the opcw executive committee and by the united nations security council to press ahead on this goal. we intend to do so. this is why our stat
exercise rights of its owners and forth is a roots that only judge walton in the district here used which is the third-party standing doctrine. i would like to begin by looking at the claims of the gilardi's as individuals. several things are undisputed. the gilardi's control and make the decisions for the companies including what goes in and what's kept out of the company health plans. third the gilardi have a well-documented religious or four of the hhs mandate challenge here today requires the companies to include those things and their plans for face significant lines. and five those things should only be included in the plan if francis philip gilardi direct them to be included. given those undisputed facts it's our view that the court should have applied the test of the thomas case and asked whether the hhs mandate put substantial pressure on the gilardi's to modify their long-standing behavior and violate their religious police. the responses of course it does. they either abandon their religious belief that they can't have their company pay for these things or go out with business.
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